• usiacr

Suspicious Activity/Possible Hacking On This Website Traced Back To MIT

Over the last few years, US Illegal Alien Crime Report's (USIACR) website has been hacked into hundreds of times, costing its founder and operator a small fortune in internet security monitoring and IT/webmaster fees to repair the damage. Most of the attacks come from individuals, likely on the radical left, but a few have originated from large corporations and well known institutions, who could also be considered members of the radical left.


In July 2019, USIACR received the following emails (the exact identification numbers in the IP address have been redacted):


"This email was sent from your website "United States Illegal Alien Crime Report" by the Wordfence plugin at Saturday 6th of July 2019 at 02:22:14 PM

Wordfence has blocked IP address 18.13.54.###.

The reason is: "Exceeded the maximum global requests per minute for crawlers or humans."

User IP: 18.13.54.###

User hostname: eofe-service002.mit.edu

User location: Cambridge, United States"


Then, the next day...


"This email was sent from your website "United States Illegal Alien Crime Report" by the Wordfence plugin at Sunday 7th of July 2019 at 02:53:24 AM

Wordfence has blocked IP address 18.13.54.###.

The reason is: "Exceeded the maximum global requests per minute for crawlers or humans."

User IP: 18.13.54.###

User hostname: eofe-service002.mit.edu

User location: Cambridge, United States"


There were other incidents as well, but in every security report in which the suspicious activity was reported to have emanated from The Massachusetts Institute of Technonolgy (MIT), the IP addresses were registered to Mark Silis, the vice-president of information systems and technology for MIT.


Several attempts were made to contact Mr. Silis, all to no avail.


Then, in September 2019, a woman who identified herself as his secretary picked up the phone, and was given a detailed account of the suspicious activity traced back to her boss's IP addresses. Again, I left my contact information, and now, nine months later, have yet to receive a reply.


Of course, I have no way to prove, nor am I suggesting that Silis was the one who was actually behind the possible attempts at hacking into the website. After all, thousands of people pass through the halls of MIT every day.


Someone else could have used one of his computers on a Saturday afternoon, or at three o' clock in the morning, or, perhaps someone hacked into his system.


Who knows?


The good news is that after the rather lengthy conversation with "the secretary," there were no more reports of suspicious activity emanating from MIT.


*It should also be noted that this reporter chose to leave out the specific email addresses, phone numbers and IP addresses traced back to all of this 'activity.' All of that information is saved in multiple locations, including inside more than one attorney's office.


Don't ever be afraid to speak truth to power, nor to report your website being hacked and damaged to the feds (see how to do that here)...it just might work!